Abstract # 107:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 02:15 PM-02:30 PM: Session 16 (Decatur A) Oral Presentation


ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF THE ASP CONSERVATION SMALL GRANT PROGRAM: TOWARD ANOTHER 25 YEARS OF EFFECTING PRIMATE CONSERVATION

E. P. Riley and A. A. Zak
Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-6040, USA
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     Since 1989, ASP has provided funding in support of research and education projects aimed at promoting and effecting primate conservation. A total of 170 projects on 66 primate species have been supported in 40 countries. In an effort to assess the conservation impact of the ASP Conservation Small Grant program, the ASP Conservation Committee developed and administered a voluntary survey to former grant recipients from the years of 1997 – 2012. Of the 106 people contacted, 42 completed the survey, yielding a response rate of approximately 40%. Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported at least one conservation outcome. Increased support for conservation and research, and collection of baseline data were the two most common outcomes. Eighty-one percent of respondents reported that their projects resulted in capacity building through the training and employment of students, local people, and protected area staff. Fifty percent of respondents reported publishing project results in scholarly journals. Project results were also disseminated via newspapers, local radio and TV, scholarly presentations at conferences, and presentations to local schools and communities. The top five factors impeding conservation outcomes were: limited funding, limited time, illegal resource extraction, changes in local government, and lack of support from local people. The top three suggestions for ensuring more successful outcomes were: develop partnerships with local governments and NGOs; establish a long-term research presence; and secure follow-up funding.