Abstract # 61:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


THE EFFECTS OF CHRONIC INTRANASAL OXYTOCIN ON RESPONSE TO NOVELTY IN JUVENILE TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

T. A. Weinstein1, S. P. Mendoza1, W. A. Mason1, M. Solomon2, S. Jacob3 and K. L. Bales1,4
1University of California - Davis, California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA, USA, 2MIND Institute, University of California - Davis, Sacramento, CA, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 4Department of Psychology, University of California - Davis, Davis, CA
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     The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) regulates many important behaviors including attachment relationship formation, sexual behavior, social recognition, and stress reactivity. We examined how chronic intranasal OT administration affects juvenile coppery titi monkeys’ response to novelty. Four females and four males housed in indoor family groups at the California National Primate Research Center received daily treatment with either 0.8 IU/kg OT dissolved in 50 ul saline (n=4) or saline alone (n=4) from 12-18 months of age. We measured latencies to retrieve banana pieces placed in front of novel patterned backgrounds at months 15, 17, and 19. Testing involved six 30-second trials repeated across 4 days: trial one consisted of the baseline solid background, followed by four novel patterned backgrounds escalating in complexity, followed by baseline. A linear mixed model tested the effects of treatment, sex, age, test day, and pattern complexity on retrieval latencies. We found a significant interaction between treatment and sex (p<0.001): OT-treated females retrieved the banana more quickly than did saline-treated females, while OT-treated males retrieved the banana more slowly than did saline-treated males. Treatment also interacted with age (p=0.017): over development, retrieval latencies declined more sharply in OT-treated animals than in saline-treated animals. Our results suggest that chronic intranasal OT’s effect on titi monkeys’ response to novelty is sex-dependent and changes over developmental time. Funding: NIH HD071998, P51OD011107, and the Good Nature Institute.