Abstract # 5888 Event # 196:

Scheduled for Monday, September 15, 2014 01:15 PM-01:30 PM: Session 27 (Mary Gay) Oral Presentation


THE PERSONALITY, SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING, AND HEALTH OF CAPTIVE GIBBONS (FAMILY HYLOBATIDAE)

A. Weiss1, M. C. Gartner1, F. B. Morton2, C. Cunningham4 and M. Inoue-Murayama3
1The University of Edinburgh, Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, USA, 2The University of Stirling, 3Wildlife Research Center of Kyoto University, 4Abertay University
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     Gibbons are noted for their monogamy and high level of species diversity; both may influence their personality. We sent personality, subjective well-being, and health questionnaires to facilities that housed gibbons (Family Hylobatidae). We obtained ratings of personality on 162 gibbons, subjective well-being on a subset of 109 gibbons, and health on a subset of 51 gibbons. One item, with an intraclass correlation (ICC[3,k]) less than 0 was not reliable across raters. The ICC(3,k)s of the remaining items ranged from .04 to .81 (median = .58) and were thus acceptable. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the personality items yielded 6 components for the Hylobates (n = 84) and 5 for a combined sample (n = 78) comprising 6 Hoolock, 38 Nomascus, and 34 Symphalangus. Four components --- Extraversion/Openness, Dominance, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism --- generalized across genera. PCA of the subjective well-being items revealed one dimension. Extraversion/Openness was associated with higher subjective well-being (r = .52, p < .001) and better rated health (r = .50, p < .001). Agreeableness was associated with higher subjective well-being (r = .65, p < .001). Neuroticism was associated with lower subjective well-being (r = -.32, p < .001) and poorer rated health (r = -.39, p < .001). These findings reveal that gibbon personality and its association with well-being and health resemble those found in other primates, including humans.