Abstract # 5892 Event # 197:

Scheduled for Monday, September 15, 2014 01:30 PM-01:45 PM: Session 27 (Mary Gay) Oral Presentation


PROFILES IN COURAGE: LEADERSHIP BY MALE TUFTED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS (SAPAJUS NIGRITUS) DURING INTERGROUP ENCOUNTERS

C. J. Scarry
Queens College, Department of Anthropology, CUNY, Flushing, NY 11367, USA
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     Theoretical arguments suggest that collective male resource defense is difficult to maintain. Yet among Argentine tufted capuchin monkeys, dominant and subordinate males are equally likely to lead intergroup aggression over high quality resources. To understand the potential benefits to males, I performed a principal components analysis, using behavioral data collected through instantaneous focal animal sampling (N = 130.7 hrs), to create sociospatial profiles for 12 adult and subadult males that were not correlated with rank. The first three principal components can broadly be considered as measures of social integration and dietary quality or spatial integration. I fitted generalized linear mixed effects models using these measures of male profile, rank, and the asymmetry in male group size. The best fit model included the asymmetry in male group size, as well as principal components one and two, outperforming a model substituting male rank for male sociospatial profile (?AIC = 3.3). As males become more socially and spatially isolated and spend more time foraging versus feeding on fruits, they are increasingly likely to take riskier forward positions during aggressive intergroup encounters. These results suggest that subordinate males may use participation in intergroup encounters to gain social tolerance or defend resources critical to their own physical condition. Financial support provided by the Leakey Foundation, the National Geographic Society, NSF-DDIG (BCS-0752683 to C.H. Janson), and the Wenner-Gren Foundation.