Abstract # 5894 Poster # 144:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


ONTOGENY OF POSITIONAL BEHAVIOR AND HABITAT USE IN ANGOLA BLACK AND WHITE COLOBUS MONKEYS (COLOBUS ANGOLENSIS PALLIATUS) FROM SOUTH COASTAL KENYA

N. T. Dunham and W. S. McGraw
The Ohio State University, Department of Anthropology, 4034 Smith Laboratory, 174 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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     Primatologists interested in understanding constraints on positional behavior frequently examine relationships among body size, locomotion, posture, and habitat use. Previous studies have attempted to associate interspecific differences in body size to propensities to use certain positional behaviors and support sizes; however, few studies have examined the interaction of these variables within species. We compare locomotor, postural, and support use data among different age classes in an African colobine to test the null hypotheses of no differences across age categories. Data were collected from June to August 2012 (~340 hours) on three groups of Peters’ Angola black and white colobus monkeys (Colobus angolensis palliatus) inhabiting a mosaic of habitats in coastal Kenya’s Diani Forest. Instantaneous time point sampling was used to generate overall locomotor, postural, and support use profiles for three age classes: infant, juvenile/sub-adult, and adult. Pairwise comparisons using G-tests revealed significant differences between adult vs. infant locomotor profiles and adult vs. infant postural profiles. Juvenile/sub-adult locomotor and postural profiles were not significantly different from those of infants or adults. All pairwise comparisons of overall support use profiles were significant. These results suggest that adult-like positional behavior profiles are present by the juvenile/sub-adult period despite discrepancies in support use. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 2012136655) and The Ohio State University.