Abstract # 5896 Event # 16:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 01:45 PM-02:00 PM: Session 5 (Mary Gay)


VITAMIN D METABOLITES; VALUE COMPARISONS IN THREE LABORATORY PRIMATE SPECIES:COMMON MARMOSET, RHESUS AND CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUE

T. E. Ziegler1,2, A. Kapoor1,2, C. J. Hedman1,2,3 and J. W. Kemnitz1,2,4
1Wisconsin National Primate Res. Ctr., Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53715, USA, 2Institute of Clinical and Translational Research, University of Wisconsin, 3Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 4Department of Cell and Regnerative Biology, University of Wisconsin
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     Vitamin D, in its various forms, has many roles in the body, especially in bone health, immune response, cancer prevention, endocrine function and neuroprotection. New methods have increased the sensitivity and selectivity for measuring human vitamin D metabolites, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) while few comparisons have been performed for nonhuman primates. Here we compare the major vitamin D metabolites in the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, the rhesus monkey, macaca mulatta, and cynomolgus monkey, macaca fascicularis, to human values by tandem mass spectrometry. Serum samples collected from twenty-five monkeys of each species were assayed for 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 values. Significant differences in 25(OH)D3 concentrations were found between species (F=38, df=3.84, P=0.0001) with marmoset values higher than all other species (P<0.05) and the macaques had significantly higher values than humans (P<0.05). Values for 1,25(OH)2D3 showed the same pattern of significant differences (F=84, df=3.88, P=0.0001). Female marmosets had lower 25(OH)D3 levels than males, and male rhesus showed a significant decrease with age. The most striking aspect was the high variability of values within the marmosets and macaques for both metabolites as the laboratory primates have a controlled diet, consistent UV exposure, and even similar genetic constraints. The data suggest new research questions to determine the factors influencing the within species variability. Support from NIH RR000167 and UL1TR000427