Abstract # 5910 Poster # 78:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


PERSONALITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGES IN FRIENDSHIPS AFTER SOCIAL SEPARATION IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

J. Jin1, B. A. Beisner1,2, J. J. Vandeleest1 and B. McCowan1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Population Health & Reproduction, University of California, Davis
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     Social support plays a crucial role in physical and mental well-being. Following disruptions to one’s affiliative network, an individual adjusts its affiliative relationships by making new friends and/or strengthening existing relationships. To understand whether personality is associated with different social adjustment strategies after social separation, we extracted data on personality and affiliation from a 20-week matriline defragmentation experiment in which 20 rhesus macaque individuals were permanently removed from their captive social group to improve matrilineal cohesion. Subjects were (n=55) rhesus macaques living in a half-acre outdoor enclosure at the California National Primate Research Center. Personality was assessed by adjective ratings based on 12 10-min focal observations. Factor analysis with direct oblimin rotation yielded 3 personality factors: Confidence, Excitability and Sociability. Affiliation (huddle, groom) was recorded using scan-sampling. Controlling for demographic variables (e.g. age, sex) in all models, we found more sociable animals huddled with and groomed smaller proportions of new partners, (Bs<-0.07, ps<0.05), and also groomed more old partners (B=-0.09, p=0.04). More Excitable animals groomed a higher proportions of new partners (B=0.13, p=0.02). Finally, more Confident individuals received more grooming (B=0.11, p=0.09). These results suggest that individuals differed in how they adapted to social separations, and personality may underlie differential strategies of social adjustment, which potentially affects outcomes of coping with social separations.