Abstract # 56:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


INTERPRETING CENSUS VARIATION IN PLATYRRHINES: DECADAL AND SEASONAL REPEATED CENSUSES AT BROWNSBERG NATURE PARK, SURINAME

M. A. Norconk1, B. W. Wright2, J. W. Moore1 and J. A. Ledogar3
1Dept. of Anthropology, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA, 2Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, 3University at Albany - SUNY
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     The ability to collect accurate information about species presence and relative abundance quickly is critical for conservation efforts where time constraints and cost prohibit long-term assessments. Census techniques have become standardized, but there has been less discussion of the influence of species-specific behaviors on primate census accuracy (e.g., Type I error—overestimating group abundance or Type II errors—failing to detect a group when present). We conducted decadal (2003 and 2013) and seasonal (2013-wet season; 2013-dry season) censuses at Brownsberg Nature Park, Suriname, using standard techniques to record the presence, size, and composition of primate groups (7 species). Census effort (i.e., distance walked) ranged from 208 km in 26 days (2003) to 219 km in 15 days (2013-wet) to 93 km in 6 days (2013-dry). We calculated standard deviations of observed number of groups to compare sample periods. Alouatta macconnelli, Saguinus midas and Pithecia pithecia had relatively high standard deviations (3.6 to 7.0) suggesting the possibility of inaccurate group counts. Sapajus apella, Chiropotes sagulatus, Ateles paniscus, and Cebus olivaceus had low values (0 to 1.2) suggesting confidence in repeated measures. We avoided Type I errors in the latter species because we had prior knowledge of the site, but Type II errors are difficult to avoid in high-density conditions where groups may be missed. Research supported by IPS-Jacobsen Award, Primate Conservation, Inc., Primate Action Fund (CI).