Abstract # 5934 Poster # 168:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


NOVEL OBJECT USE TASK FROM HUMAN DEMONSTRATOR TO RHESUS MACAQUE (MACACA MULATTA) RECIPIENT IMPACTED BY REACTIVITY AS MEASURED BY THE HUMAN INTRUDER TEST

A. M. Ryan, C. A. Begnoche and M. A. Novak
University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychology, Tobin Hall , 135 Hicks Way, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA
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     Object manipulation in macaques can be socially facilitated by the actions of other macaques; however, it is unclear whether humans can facilitate macaque object use. We developed a three-object manipulation task to test whether macaques would engage in object manipulation following use by a human. In this task, a human either manipulated one of three objects on a board (manipulation trials) or performed no manipulations (control trials) and then presented another board with the same three objects to macaque subjects (n=11). We examined looking time during human manipulation and subsequent object board use (OBU). The macaques looked significantly longer at the human during manipulation trials (n=3) as compared with control trials (n=3) (t (10) =2.65, p=0.024). However, spontaneous OBU varied substantially. Although 7/11 macaques manipulated objects at least once during their 6 trials, only 19 trials (28%) elicited OBU. We then categorized macaques based on OBU into two groups: yes (7) and no (4) in order to analyze factors that could account for OBU. Although looking time failed to explain group membership, a reactivity assessment called the Human Intruder Test (HIT) successfully predicted group membership. Macaques with no OBU displayed significantly higher reactivity behaviors during all phases of HIT combined (F (1, 5) = 14.33, p=0.013). Thus, spontaneous OBU seemed to be predicated on reactivity to the experimental situation rather than on social facilitation.