Abstract # 159:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


HABITAT AND FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE STATUS DIFFERENCES IN URINARY INDICES OF HEALTH IN WILD BLACK HOWLING MONKEYS (ALOUATTA PIGRA) IN BALANCAN, MEXICO

E. L. Zucker
Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
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     Female health likely varies with habitat quality, potentially mediating reproductive outcomes. To assess differences in health indices as a function of habitat type, urine samples (N=178) were collected from adult female black howling monkeys (24 different groups and subgroups) in two habitat types (playón and rainforest fragments) at Ranchería Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez, Balancan, Mexico. Samples were tested in the field for 10 parameters with commercially-available reagent strips. Proteins and nitrites were present in significantly more samples from rainforest fragment females than playón females, while playón females had significantly more samples with elevated leucocytes (tests for differences in proportions, p < .01). Rainforest females without infants had significantly more samples with elevated proteins, and significantly fewer samples with elevated leucocytes, than rainforest females with infants (p < .01). Playón females without infants had more samples with markers of poorer health for several parameters compared to playón females with infants. In both habitats, urinary pH was higher for females without infants than those with infants, while specific gravity was higher for females with infants than for those without; variability was greater for females without infants for both measures in both habitats. These patterns suggest one habitat type might be more conducive to reproduction, and females currently with infants might be in better overall health, but long-term monitoring of reproductive outcomes is necessary to confirm these relationships.