Abstract # 5977 Poster # 176:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 22 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


AFFILIATIVE RELATIONSHIPS, ALLIANCE SUPPORT, AND PERSONALITY INFLUENCE CUMULATIVE RECEIPT OF SUBORDINATION SIGNALS IN CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUE SOCIETIES

K. R. Davidek1,2, B. A. Beisner1,2 and B. McCowan1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2University of California - Davis
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     In rhesus macaques, silent-bared-teeth displays given in peaceful contexts (pSBTs) are subordination signals which communicate the long-term state of dominance relationships. The frequency and diversity of signals serve as a measure of how group members regard an individual, i.e. their social power. Although higher-ranking individuals tend to receive more pSBTs than lower-ranking conspecifics, some individuals receive more than expected given calculated ranks. We hypothesized individual attributes, e.g. temperament, sex, age, as well as social behaviors, e.g. grooming, alliance relationships, may explain why some mid-ranked individuals receive more signals than expected whereas some high-ranked individuals receive fewer than expected. We tested these hypotheses using 1700+ hours of behavioral data on seven groups of captive rhesus macaques, at the California National Primate Research Center. We fit multi-level GLMs to counts of pSBTs received to understand the social mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Animals received more SBTs when they were from smaller matrilines, frequently groomed non-kin (p<0.001), received more grooming (p<0.001), and provided alliance support to subordinates (p=0.09). Evaluation of personality factors demonstrated that as matriline size increases, very confident individuals are less likely to receive pSBTs (p=0.005, b=- 0.030). Social network analyses will investigate the impact of an animal’s betweenness in the network to understand the influence of directionality and reciprocation on signaling. Continued analysis will provide important insights into the detailed behavioral mechanisms governing macaque societies.