Abstract # 5980 Poster # 64:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Decatur B) Poster Presentation


MAOA GENOTYPE X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION AND INFLUENCE ON MONOAMINE NEUROTRANSMITTER FUNCTIONING IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA) LIVING IN LARGE OUTDOOR CORRALS

D. G. Loveland1, B. E. Dent1, M. A. Skidmore1, A. N. Sorenson1, M. L. Schwandt2, S. G. Lindell2, S. J. Suomi2, C. S. Barr2 and J. D. Higley1
11042 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, Provo, UT 84602, USA, 2National Institutes of Health, NICHD, and NIAAA
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     Introduction: Variants of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOa) gene are associated with psychopathologies such as depression, anxiety, excessive alcohol consumption, and violence in both humans and rhesus monkeys. Previous research has primarily focused on behavior associated with the MAOa gene, however this study examines genotype and environmental effects (rearing) on central monoamine functioning. We tested the hypothesis that MAOa genotypes would interact with maternal presence/absence (GxE) over time to modulate the monoamine systems. Methods: Cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained from 116 male infant rhesus macaques on days 14, 30, 90, 120, and 150 of life and assayed for HVA, MHPG, and 5-HIAA (metabolites of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, respectively). Subjects were reared either as controls with their mothers or in mother-absent, peer-only groups. Results: There were main effects for rearing (p<0.0009, p<0.001) and genotype (p<0.0009, p<0.010) for the norepinephrine and serotonin systems. Repeated measure ANOVAs also showed significant three-way GXE by time interactions for both systems (p<0.012 and p<0.040 respectively). There was a main effect of genotype (p<0.004), as well as a GXE interaction for the dopamine system (p<0.013). Conclusions: These results largely confirmed our hypothesis. To the extent that various forms of psychopathology are modulated by the monoamines, our findings show a GxE interaction that increases in effect size over time possibly leading to behavioral disorders such as aggression, depression, alcoholism, and anxiety.