Abstract # 8:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 11:15 AM-11:30 AM: Session 2 (Decatur A) Oral Presentation


IDENTIFYING HOTSPOTS FOR ZOONOTIC TRANSMISSION: QUANTIFING FINE-SCALE MOVEMENT OF DOMESTICATED ANIMALS RELATIVE TO CHIMPANZEES AT GOMBE STREAM NATIONAL PARK, TANZANIA

G. Vazquez-Prokopec1, M. B. Parsons1,2, D. A. Travis3, E. V. Lonsdorf4, I. Lipende5, B. Gilagiza5, S. Kamenya5, L. Pintea5 and T. R. Gillespie1
1Emory University & Rollins School of Public Health, Departments of Environmental Sciences & Environmental Health, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA, 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA, 3College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 4Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA, USA, 5The Jane Goodall Institute, Kigoma, Tanzania
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     Domesticated animals are an important source of pathogens to endangered wildlife populations, especially when anthropogenic activities increase their overlap with humans and wildlife. Recent work in Tanzania reports the introduction of Cryptosporidium into wild chimpanzee populations and the increased risk of ape mortality associated with SIVcpz-Cryptosporidium co-infection. Here we describe the application of novel GPS technology to track the mobility of domesticated animals (27 goats, 2 sheep and 8 dogs) with the goal of identifying potential routes for Cryptosporidium introduction into Gombe National Park. Only goats (5/27) and sheep (2/2) were positive for Cryptosporidium. Analysis of GPS tracks indicated that a crop field frequented by both chimpanzees and domesticated animals was a potential hotspot for Cryptosporidium transmission. This study demonstrates the applicability of GPS data-loggers in studies of fine-scale mobility of animals and suggests that domesticated animal–wildlife overlap should be considered beyond protected boundaries for long-term conservation strategies. Supported by the Morris Animal Foundation, Emory University Global Health Institute, Tanzanian National Parks, Tanzanian Wildlife Research Institute and Jane Goodall Institute.