Abstract # 6047 Event # 97:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:15 AM-10:30 AM: Session 15 (Henry Oliver) Oral Presentation


SOCIAL SUBORDINATION ALTERS NEUROBEHAVIORAL DEVELOPMENT IN FEMALE MACAQUES: FOCUS ON PREFRONTAL CORTEX, AMYGDALA AND EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY DURING ADOLESCENCE.

M. Sanchez, B. Howell, J. Godfrey and M. Wilson
Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory Ujniversity, and, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
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     Summary of presentation for the SYMPOSIUM: "Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Social Stress Effects on Health": We are investigating the neurodevelopmental effects of social subordination in peri-pubertal female macaques, particularly on prefrontal-amygdala circuits important for emotional and stress regulation. We will present current findings using structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI techniques and will integrate the discussion of the effects of social experience on brain maturation with those caused by developmental increases in estradiol during adolescence. Our findings suggest that social subordination affect neurodevelopment of juvenile subordinate animals, who have bigger amygdala volumes consistent with structural effects of chronic stress in the literature, as well as altered prefrontal cortex structural and functional connectivity with limbic regions, including amygdala and ventral striatum. The alterations in tracts connecting prefrontal, sensory processing, motor and association cortices are associated with increased emotional reactivity in subordinate animals, particularly with higher submissive and fear behaviors.