Abstract # 6049 Event # 100:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:00 AM-11:15 AM: Session 15 (Henry Oliver) Oral Presentation


EFFECTS OF SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS AND SOCIAL STRESS ON BODY COMPOSITION AND CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN FEMALE CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES (MACACA FASCICULARIS)

M. G. Silverstein, T. C. Register, S. E. Appt and C. A. Shively
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology-Comparative Medicine, Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology Graduate Program, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
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     Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most commonly used drugs in the United States, particularly by women, there is a scarcity of information regarding systemic effects of chronic use. To determine the effects of a commonly prescribed SSRI, sertraline HCl (Zoloft®), on body composition and carbohydrate metabolism we conducted a controlled, prospective, randomized, preclinical trial in socially dominant and subordinate adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis; n=42). Following a 1-month baseline phase of single housing, monkeys were randomly assigned social groups. After an 18-month pretreatment phase, monkeys were assigned sertraline (20 mg/kg) or placebo treatment for 18 months. Agonistic interactions were recorded (on average 33.3 hours/monkey across the pretreatment and treatment phases) and used to derive social status. Fasting blood samples, body weights, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan data was obtained at the end of each phase. Body weight, body fat, lean mass, leptin, glucose, and triglyceride data was analyzed by 2 (Sertraline, Placebo) X (Dominant, Subordinate) x 3 (Phase) analysis of variance. Sertraline treated animals had lower body weights (p=0.03), lower % body fat (p<0.001), higher % lean mass (p<0.001), and reduced leptin concentrations (p=0.05) compared to placebo-controls. Subordinate animals had elevated glucose (p=0.01) and triglyceride (p=0.03) concentrations compared to dominant animals. These findings indicate that SSRIs and social stress may influence body composition and carbohydrate metabolism in women.