Abstract # 98:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: Session 15 (Henry Oliver) Oral Presentation


ACUTE STRESSOR EXPOSURE POTENTIATES THE CONSEQUENCES OF CHRONIC STRESS ON INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION

J. Kohn, M. Wilson and Z. Johnson
Yerkes NPRC, 2409 taylor lane, lawrenceville , ga 30043, USA
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     We have previously shown that subordinate and thus chronically stressed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), have an up-regulation of expression of numerous inflammatory genes within peripheral blood when compared to dominant cage mates. In this study we examine the effects of an acute stressor upon peripheral blood gene expression in ten dominant and ten subordinate group-housed female rhesus monkeys. Briefly, we extracted total RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and built mRNA sequencing libraries from each sample. We generated ~15 million sequencing reads for each library. Reads were mapped to the rhesus genome (rheMac2) using STAR, and differential expression measured using the cufflinks software suite. Results show that subordinate animals have an impaired ability to down regulate the normal proinflammatory expression patterns that results from acute stress. These data provide some of the first evidence of how acute stress and chronic stress have differing effects on peripheral gene expression in female rhesus monkeys.