Abstract # 81:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


AN EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF VIDEO CONTENT AS A FORM OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA).

S. A. Hoker1,2, K. M. Habbel1,2 and P. J. Pierre1,2
11220 Capitol Court, Madison, WI 53715, USA, 2Wisconsin National Primate Research Center
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     Video content is often provided as a form of sensory enrichment for laboratory nonhuman primates (NHP) . A number of studies report that NHPs engage with video; however, few studies measure video interaction unobtrusively. The goal of this study was to assess the extent to which NHPs engage with videos and whether content will affect interest. Nineteen mixed sex (male, n=12; female, n=7) rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) (old, n=10; young, n=9) participated in this study. The facility enrichment plan requires that animals receive video for 1 hour weekly. Participants were familiar with the video delivery procedure. We equipped the television with two webcams directed towards the target animals. Two forms of video were presented: cartoons and footage of pen-housed conspecifics. Each type was presented for 5 trials. Snapshots of each subject were taken every two minutes. Each 2 min frame was scored for looking behavior, defined as the subject’s eyes visible and directed toward the television. For standard content, we found the animals spent 25% (15.1 min.) of the total time watching. Conspecific content increased looking to 34% (20.5 min.). Younger animals viewed the television more than older animals. Older animals time spent looking did not change with content (23.4% vs. 21.1%). However, older single housed monkeys spent less time looking when compared to paired monkeys irrespective of content [Standard content: F(1,18)=13.11,p<0.01; Conspecific content: F(1,18)=30.1,p<0.001].