Abstract # 124:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: (Cascade E) Oral Presentation


INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN THE AFFILIATIVE, PLAY, AND ACTIVITY BEHAVIORS OF CAPTIVE BONOBOS (PAN PANISCUS)

J. S. Martin and S. A. Suarez
Miami University, Department of Anthropology, 120 Upham Hall, Oxford, Ohio 45056, USA
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     Bonobos exhibit a diverse repertoire of social behaviors, and are thus an ideal species for the investigation of stable individual differences in multi-trait social behavior. Previous bonobo personality research has been limited by small sample sizes (n = 4-5) or the use of observer ratings. The present study seeks to address these issues by using behavioral observation methods to assess the social personality traits of captive bonobos. As predicted by prior questionnaire research, it was hypothesized that the subjects would exhibit stable individual differences in their affiliative, play, and activity behaviors (locomotion, foraging, etc.). Data were collected via instantaneous and 1-0 sampling during 1 hr focal animal observations (N = 216) rotated among adult and juvenile subjects (n = 10) at the Cincinnati Zoo between September 2014 and May 2015. One-way ANOVAs with subjects as fixed factors were conducted for 106 hr of preliminary data. The results suggest that the subjects significantly differed in their mean frequency of affiliative [F(9,96) = 5.85; p < .001], play [F(9,96) = 2.65; p = .009], and activity [F(9,96) = 5.80; p < . 001] behaviors during fall 2014. These and other behaviors exhibited moderate repeatability (r) across 1 hr sampling periods (range = 0.14 - 0.69; mean = 0.32), providing initial support for the hypothesis that bonobos exhibit stable personality differences in their social behavior.