Abstract # 6162 Poster # 92:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


LABORATORY HOUSED RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA) WITH SELF INJURIOUS BEHAVIOR SHOW A BLUNTED BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO THE HUMAN INTRUDER TEST

E. J. Peterson1, J. M. Worlein2, G. H. Lee2, A. M. Dettmer4, E. K. Varner3 and M. A. Novak3
1University of Massachusetts Amherst, Neuroscience and Behavior Graduate Program, Amherst, MA 01003, USA, 2Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle WA, 3Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 4Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, NIH, Poolesville, MD
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     Self injurious behavior (SIB) occurs in some monkeys but it is unclear whether this pattern is associated with affective disorders (e.g., anxiety or depression). Our objective was to examine the relationship between anxiety and SIB in macaques using a well established measure of anxiety, the human intruder test (HIT). A cageside variant was run on 77 macaques, 41 with a record of SIB. The HIT consisted of four 2-minute phases, baseline, profile, stare, and away (back turned). We predicted that monkeys with SIB would demonstrate more anxiety on this test. Video tapes of the HIT were scored for duration and frequency by observers blind to the subjects’ SIB status and analyzed by a mixed-ANOVA. In contrast to our prediction, SIB subjects spent significantly less time showing anxious behavior than controls (p=0.046); this effect was present during the profile and stare phases (p=0.013). SIB subjects showed significantly less aggressive behavior toward the intruder (p=0.042); this effect was present during the stare phase (p=0.012). SIB subjects showed the same range of behaviors as controls, but significantly less behavioral change overall (p=0.038) and more specifically during the stare phase (p=0.009). These data suggest that SIB is associated with a blunted response to the HIT with lowered affect during the stare phase. These results are inconsistent with anxiety but more consistent with a depressive like disorder. Supported by NIHGrantR24OD011180.