Abstract # 87:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED RHESUS MONKEY INFANTS (MACACA MULATTA) IN AN SPF BREEDING COLONY PART 1: FOSTERING

T. Meeker, G. Von Scherr, A. Cerqueda, K. Cummings, D. Mesa Osorio, I. Barnes, C. Docampo, K. Bailey and R. Stavisky
Yerkes National Primate Research Center Field Station, Division of Animal Resources, 2409 Taylor Lane, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, USA
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     In 2014, 397 infants were born at the YNPRC Field Station SPF rhesus colony. 9% (n=34) were abandoned and eligible for fostering (if reuniting with dam failed). There are five candidate foster mothers: 1) Females that have recently given birth, 2) Females that have had a recent stillbirth or lost an infant, 3) Females with a foster history, 4) Females that accept infants in a compound, and 5) Females who accept infants in caging. Of the 34 abandoned infants, 12% were reunited with dam, 41% were fostered, 36% were orphaned and raised in the nursery, and 12% died. 12 females fostered infants; 2 took 2 infants, 8 took a foster in addition to their own infant, while 2 females fostered a single infant each. The conditions of the dams included: recent birth (n=9), lactating from the previous year’s infant (n=2) or death of an older infant (n=1). 43% of the pairings were accomplished in caging, with 57% occurring in the compound. 36% of the dams had a fostering history. There was a significant relationship between date born and foster success; animals born earlier in the birth season (when there were the highest numbers of birth) were more likely to be fostered than animals born later (Spearman’s Rho 0.503, p<0.003) This suggests that the availability of females that had recently given birth increased foster success rates.