Abstract # 6178 Event # 171:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 05:15 PM-05:30 PM: (Cascade E) Oral Presentation


BEHAVIORAL COMPARISON OF MOTHER- AND NURSERY-REARED PIGTAILED MACAQUE (MACACA NEMESTRINA) FEMALES HOUSED SOCIALLY IN LARGE INDOOR/OUTDOOR ENCLOSURES

J. M. Worlein, G. H. Lee, A. Jung and R. Kroeker
Washington National Primate Res. Ctr., University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
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     Nursery rearing of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been associated with increased risk for developing abnormal behaviors. However, most studies have been undertaken in nursery-reared animals maintained in a laboratory environment for most or all of their lives. This study investigated behavior of 14 nursery-reared and 14 age-matched mother-reared female pigtailed macaques (2.5-5.5 years of age) maintained in social groups at the WaNPRC Arizona breeding facility. Animals were housed in large connected indoor (216 sf)/outdoor (242-400 sf) enclosures and were fed twice a day (morning and afternoon). Daily food or destructible enrichment was also provided. Twenty three hours of data were collected using The Observer XT software. Data were analyzed using a paired T test. Rates of behavior were remarkably similar between the two groups. The only significant differences arose in appetitive behaviors. Nursery-reared animals spent more time eating (p=0.03) and drinking (p=0.01) despite the fact that there were no differences in weight between the two groups. Differences in rates of stereotypic behaviors approached significance (p=0.059) although proportions of time nursery-reared animals engaged in this behavior was extremely low (3.3%). These data suggest that NR females exhibit relatively normal behavioral repertoires when housed in non-laboratory conditions. They also suggest that subtle metabolic differences may exist between these two groups. Funded by NIH grants P51 OD010425 and R24OD01180-15