Abstract # 6200 Poster # 202:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


ASSESSING THE SENSITIVITY OF THE PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM TO THE PRESENCE OF SOCIALLY MONOGAMOUS PAIR MATES USING ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY.

E. S. Rothwell1,2,5, E. Bliss-Moreau1,2,3, G. Moadab2 and K. L. Bales1,2,4
1University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 4Psychology Department, 5Animal Behavior Graduate Group
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     High quality relationships reliably promote psychological well-being and physical health, whereas diminished or lack of social support conveys detrimental effects. Cardiovascular regulation by the autonomic nervous system is a candidate mechanism by which relationships can exert these dually beneficial effects. The autonomic nervous system dynamically regulates heart rate with the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) inhibiting the sympathetic nervous system to slow heart rate. We investigated the sensitivity of the parasympathetic nervous system to the presence of the pair mate in socially monogamous titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus). We utilized external electrocardiography with four adult titi monkeys to noninvasively index respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a PNS measure. Recordings were taken during three consecutive 10-minute test conditions: 1) social isolation 2) stranger of the opposite sex present and 3) attachment partner present. An analysis of two adult males in HLM with minute block of data nested within conditions within monkey revealed that RSA was lower in the presence of the attachment partner than during social isolation and when the stranger was present (Bo=-0.79, t(58)=3.16, p < .01). This indicates that the PNS is responsive to a pair mate in a socially monogamous primate species. This is the first study of RSA in titi monkeys and lays the foundation for developing titi monkeys as a translational model to study the social regulation of the ANS in adult attachments.