Abstract # 16:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


IDENTIFICATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI TO INFER RED COLOBUS GENETIC STRUCTURE AMONG FRAGMENTS SURROUNDING KIBALE NATIONAL PARK

A. J. Hitchcock1, M. J. Ruiz-Lopez2, N. Simons3 and N. Ting1,2,3
1Environmental Studies Program, University of Oregon, 428 E 16th St, Eugene, OR 97401, USA, 2Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, 3Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon
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     The Ugandan red colobus monkey (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) is among the most endangered primates in the world due mainly to habitat loss, particularly outside of the protected areas. As a result, the populations are very fragmented and the movement of individuals between forests can be limited. The goal of this study was to optimize a panel of microsatellite loci to determine the population genetic structure of the Ugandan red colobus inhabiting the Kibale National Park region. We tested a total of 17 microsatellite loci previously used in humans in eight fecal samples and eight blood samples. All the markers were polymorphic but one of them showed a pattern that did not allow successful genotyping and was not used further. The remaining 16 markers had between 2 and 9 alleles (mean= 4.68), which matches previous studies of other red colobus populations. This set of markers has been further used to genotype 196 fecal samples and 95 blood samples from 5 fragments outside the park and 2 localities within the park, and is adequate to understand population structure in this species. Such information will be used to better understand which types of landscape features inhibit movement in this species and to understand the effects of human disturbance on disease transmission.