Abstract # 101:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


MULTIPLE UNIQUE, ADAPTIVE SHIFTS IN LIFE HISTORY ACROSS PRIMATES CORRESPOND TO SHIFTS IN DIET

L. L. Taylor1,2 and J. P. Herrera3
1Dept. of Anthropology, Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-2005, USA, 2Lemur Conservation Foundation, 3Stony Brook University
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     The evolution of life history is intimately related to other traits including body size, and ecological factors such as population density. Evolutionary shifts in optimal life history strategies should then correlate to shifts in other traits such as diet, habitat use, or sociality. We compiled data on morphology, life history (LH), environment and diet for 100+ taxa to test these hypotheses: 1) there are multiple evolutionary shifts to unique optimal LH strategies, and 2) LH traits are predicted by diet and/or environment. Diet is the strongest predictor of LH, with shorter IBI and weaning times in folivores than frugivores or omnivores (LRT vs null = 7.10, p=0.03). An adaptive peak with high selective constraint (alpha parameter ~0.15) best fits the relationship, suggests strong evolutionary stasis around LH optima. Annual precipitation does not explain variation in LH. Life history likely evolved towards unique optima with different levels of selective constraint among dietary regimes: folivores have fastest life histories/ weakest selective constraints whereas frugivores and omnivores have slower life histories/ stronger selective constraints. The folivore fast-lane is an adaptive optimum, suggesting nutrition may influence development more than other aspects of the environment. We thank the SBU, NSF (JPH), and the UM (LLT).