Abstract # 6215 Poster # 72:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


AGE AND SEX DIFFERENCES IN AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIORS OF WILD AZARA’S OWL MONKEY (AOTUS AZARAE) IN FORMOSA, ARGENTINA

M. K. Corley1,3, S. Xia2 and E. Fernandez-Duque3
13260 South Street , University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA, 2Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, 3Department of Anthropology, Yale University
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     Azara’s owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) are monogamous primates, with usually one adult male, one adult female and 1-3 young per group. To examine the role that aggression (e.g. biting, chasing, displacing) may play in group maintenance and dispersal, we collected 20-minute focal behavioral samples from 129 individuals in 15 groups in Formosa, Argentina, between 2001 and 2014 (6580 samples; ~2190 hours). Using frequency of aggression we examined whether the role an individual played in aggressive events (actor vs. recipient) varied with age and sex. Eight percent of focal samples (509 in 14 groups) contained aggressive behaviors. Preliminary analysis (1 group, 1262 focal samples) showed that all adults were more frequently actors (n=8, mean 76% ± 14%) than recipients, whereas all subadults (n=5, 24-48 months) and most juveniles (4/5, 6-24 months) were more frequently recipients (subadults: 94% ± 8%; juvenile: 64% ± 27%; Wilcoxon sign-rank test between subadults and juveniles: W=23.5, p=0.027). Adults of both sexes showed similar levels of aggression towards the young (males: 89%, females: 88%), consistent with the general lack of sex differences characteristic of these sexually monomorphic primates. However, in 28 recorded conflicts between pair mates, males were more frequently actors (68%). Complete analysis of all groups will allow us to further evaluate how age, sex and other factors are related to aggression in owl monkeys. NSF BCS6400621020, BCS837921, BCS904867, BCS924352.