Abstract # 176:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


PAPIO ANUBIS SEED DISPERSAL PRELIMINARY RESULTS: FEWER SEEDS DISAPPEAR IN LOGGED COMPARTMENT THAN UNLOGGED IN KIBALE NATIONAL PARK, UGANDA

J. Bonavia and J. E. Lambert
The University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Anthropology, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
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     In Kibale National Park, Uganda, olive baboons (Papio anubis) are eclectic omnivores, with very large home ranges comprising a diversity of habitat types and forest compartments with different logging histories. Baboons thus have the potential to disperse many seed species into multiple locations, some of which may be more favorable for seed fate. We followed (June-July 2014) an habituated group of olive baboons in Kibale’s Kanyawara study area to investigate their seed rain into logged and unlogged forest. Eighty-three dung samples were collected opportunistically, and 1131 seeds were removed from 10 random dung samples. Fifty-meter transects were established in two forestry compartments with different logging histories: 3 in logged forest (K-15) and 3 in unlogged (K-30). Using the three most common seed species, 5 seeds of either Solanum spp (n=81), grass spp (n=67) or Aframomum spp (n=30) were randomly placed at seed stations every 10m along the transects (n=90 seeds unlogged, n=88 seeds logged) and monitored for seed damage and disappearance. We recorded the proportion of whole seeds remaining for each seed station and determined K-15 versus K-30 averages. We compared these averages using paired, two-tailed t-tests. The average proportion of seeds remaining in the unlogged area was significantly lower than the logged area (p<0.01; t=4.6586). This has potential implications for the role of olive baboons in forest regeneration in Kibale National Park.