Abstract # 6239 Event # 238:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 20, 2015 11:18 AM-11:30 AM: (Cascade F) Oral Presentation


SCIENTIST, SCHOLAR, KNAVE AND FOOL: THE TINJIL INFLUENCE - 20 YEARS AND MOVING SIDEWAYS.

M. S. Novak
Central Oregon Community College, Department of Social Sciences, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701, USA
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     Twenty-one years ago, at Jim Sackett's Thursday night journal club, I first inquired about traveling to the white sandy beaches of Tinjil Island in Indonesia. Just starting graduate school my interest was to learn “hands-on” about field research. Fortunately, the fledgling International Field Study Program was starting an American component. I would serve as a pilot participant. The Field Study Program can have multiple effects. First, the program teaches the importance of social relationships. Second, good science and good questions are worth persisting on at all costs. Popularity, funding, group think and desire-based motivations have no place. Finally, for science to be successful, communication is key. Science needs to be communicated in ways our intended audiences understand. All too often, a gap is left between production and dissemination of research. Scientists and teachers frequently fail to bridge that gap. More work is needed in this area of science than any other. This idea has assumed a central role in my current pursuits as a community college professor. The Tinjil Island Field Course reveals the importance of communicating while simultaneously attempting to fill the gaps that it reveals. Tinjil and the other programs of One Earth Institute have been communicating, not to but with the world for more than 20 years spreading science to intended audiences, a model I have attempted to emulate throughout my career.