Abstract # 6242 Event # 172:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 05:30 PM-05:45 PM: (Cascade E) Oral Presentation


AFFILIATION, TOLERANCE AND PROXIMITY BETWEEN MALES AND INFANTS IN WILD COLOBUS VELLEROSUS IN GHANA IS NOT EXPLAINED BY GENETIC SIRESHIP

S. A. Fox1, E. C. Wikberg1, M. J. Ruiz-López2, J. Vayro1, N. D. Simons2, A. Crotty1, D. Christie2, N. Ting2 and P. Sicotte1
1University of Calgary, Department of Anthropology and Archaeology , 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, USA, 2University of Oregon
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     Infanticide is only a successful male reproductive strategy if males do not kill their own offspring, resulting in a conflict of interest with females over the disclosure of paternity information to males. Females should mate polyandrously to dilute paternity certainty among potentially infanticidal males. In contrast, males would benefit by developing accurate skills to distinguish their own offspring. We reported elsewhere that potential sires, defined as sexually mature males present in a group at the time of an infant’s conception, were affiliative with and tolerant of that infant more than newly immigrated unlikely sires. Here, we continue this investigation by asking if males accurately biased affiliation toward offspring.We collected focal data on 8 immigrant males (26 male-infant dyads) over 6 months from 4 groups of wild Colobus vellerosus in Ghana, a species where infanticide occurs and females mate polyandrously. We genotyped 10 STR loci to confirm paternity for 12 infants that interacted with focal males. We compared the rate of affiliation, male tolerance of infants, and time spent in proximity for sire-infant dyads (N=7) and non-sire-infant dyads (N=19) using three GLMMs where infant availability was a covariate. Paternity did not predict patterns of affiliation (F(1,23)=1.876, p=0.184), tolerance (F(1,23)=2.151, p=0.156) or proximity (F(1,23)=0.630, p=0.435). Therefore, males do not consistently discriminate between potential and actual offspring and polyandrous mating may be successfully confusing paternity among males.