Abstract # 154:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: (Cascade F) Oral Presentation


DEMOGRAPHIC AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES) FORMERLY USED IN BIOMEDICAL OR BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH

J. Ely1, L. Williams2, J. Cohen3, F. C. Connor-Stroud3, P. Sharma3 and C. Abee2
1IFA, Inc., Alamogordo, NM 88310, USA, 2Department of Veterinary Sciences, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3Division of Animal Resources, Yerkes National Primate Research Center
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     The most recent demographic analysis of captive chimpanzees formerly used in biomedical or behavioral research (FBBR) examined a young population (mean age=15 yr) during a breeding phase. Today’s population is aged (mean=28 yr), with a large geriatric (30+ yr) segment. Yet reliable demographic information is vital to rational population management and evidence-based veterinary practices for a long-lived species like chimpanzees. Demographic data on FBBR chimpanzees was compiled from multiple sources to update the demographic profile, quantify prevalent causes of death, and project population trends. There were a total of 1214 demographic records, with 338 mortality events. The estimated intrinsic rate of increase was -0.036, quantifying decline in a non-reproducing population. Population structure forecasting predicted that population size will decline 33% by 2025. The proportion of geriatric animals will increase from 32% to 80%. The top 3 causes of mortality were chronic diseases (cardiovascular, renal, cancer), displacing all infectious diseases. Results suggest a coming wave of chronic diseases. Long-term extrapolation predicted overall population extinction by 2057. Predicting the burden of morbidity associated with aging and other risk factors can facilitate advance planning and timely intervention. Continued monitoring of the changing demographics, morbidity profile and distribution of risk factors in FBBR chimpanzees is necessary to predict veterinary care and other resources that will be needed for the life-time care of increasingly geriatric chimpanzees.