Abstract # 6248 Poster # 90:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


ESTIMATING OCCUPANCY AND DETECTION PROBABILITY OF CALLICEBUS NIGRIFRONS AND CALLITHRIX AURITA FROM CALL SURVEYS IN A LARGE ATLANTIC FOREST REMNANT

M. B. Nagy-Reis1, J. D. Nichols2, J. E. Hines2, A. G. Chiarello3, M. C. Ribeiro4 and E. Z. Setz1
1Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Instituto de Biologia, Campinas, SP 13083-865, USA, 2USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, 3Universidade de São Paulo (USP), 4Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
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     Large forest remnants are key sources to maintain biodiversity, particularly for the conservation of primates within small fragments. Thus, we evaluated the primate population of a large Atlantic Forest remnant (35,000 ha) in Brazil, estimating the occupancy and detection probability of black-fronted titi monkeys (Callicebus nigrifrons) and buffy-tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix aurita). We performed 270 call surveys [three in each season (dry and wet) at each site (N=45)] using playback method. Simple multi-season occupancy models were used to investigate how area protection status, elevation, vegetation cover and hydrography influence the occupancy of each species. We also accounted the influence of time of day, season, temperature, precipitation and monthly fruit availability on their detection probability. The occupancy of titi monkeys and marmosets in the remnant was high (psi=0.97±0.05; psi=0.63±0.20, respectively). Although the analyzed environmental covariates had similar and low relevance in general for both species (since their models did not differ substantially from the null models), we had some evidence that protection status (upper-case-sigmaAICw=0.52), hydrography (upper-case-sigmaAICw=0.49) and high quality vegetation (upper-case-sigmaAICw=0.38) positively influence the occupancy of marmosets. For the detection probability, temperature had a large positive effect for both species (titi monkeys: upper-case-sigmaAICw=0.93; marmosets: sigmaAICw=0.50), emphasizing the importance of accounting for this variable in ecological and behavioral studies. Supported by: FAPESP, CAPES, FAEPEX, IdeaWild.