Abstract # 6249 Poster # 100:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


MACAQUE SPECIES DIFFER IN SOCIOAFFECTIVE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO A STANDARDIZED CHALLENGE (MACACA FASCICULARIS, M. RADIATA, M. MULATTA): POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS FOR NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH.

S. A. Skiba1, P. J. Pierre2 and A. J. Bennett1,3
1Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 22 North Charter Street , Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA, 2Behavioral Management Unit, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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     The study examines socioaffective behavior in three closely-related macaque species. Field studies and a limited number of laboratory investigations have produced evidence of species differences in key aspects of affective behavior that are highly relevant to translational behavioral neuroscience. Direct experimental comparisons are lacking, however. We evaluated species differences in male cynomolgus, rhesus, and bonnet macaques’ response to a well-validated assessment of anxiety-like behavior, the Human Intruder Paradigm (HIP) previously used only with rhesus monkeys (n=14, n=11, n=7, respectively). All three species exhibited behavioral evidence of differentiation between the baseline condition and both challenge conditions, no-eye contact, and direct stare threat by a human intruder. Cynomolgus macaques were significantly more fearful and reactive when compared to rhesus macaques. Cynomolgus macaques behaved more aggressively towards a human intruder, while bonnet macaques showed little fear or hostility. Together these findings demonstrate significant species differences in socioaffective behavior. Furthermore, this study provides the first validation of the behavioral assessment in cynomolgus and bonnet macaques. The demonstration is important as foundational data for a range of studies to test neural and behavioral genetic hypotheses in nonhuman primates.