Abstract # 166:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 04:45 PM-05:00 PM: (Cascade E) Oral Presentation


MATERNAL CARE QUALITY PREDICTS EARLY INFLAMMATION AND DISEASE RISK IN RHESUS MACAQUES

E. L. Kinnally1,2 and K. Chun1,2
1UC Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2CNPRC
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     Poor quality parental care predicts adverse health problems such as metabolic, inflammatory and cardiovascular disease. In a long-term developmental study in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we examined the impact of maternal care quality on early inflammation and risk for inflammatory disease in adulthood. Mother-infant (N=155 pairs) interactions were observed three to five times weekly in large outdoor social enclosures at the California National Primate Research Center. Mother-infant interactions were recorded using six themes (protective, affiliative, accommodating, neutral, rejecting, and aggressive). Maternal care scores were generated by subtracting rate of maternal aggressiveness from rate of protectiveness. At 3-4 months of age, plasma samples were collected from infants during a standardized biobehavioral assessment. Plasma concentrations of pro-inflammatory proteins (IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, CRP, and TNF?) were quantified. Infants that received lower care exhibited greater inflammation (Pearson correlation; r=.185, p = .03). In a subset of infants that reached 36 months of age (n = 64), presence of disease of inflammation (eg, colitis, arthritis) was investigated. Individuals that received low care (one tailed t-test, t=1.714, p = .045) and which had higher cytokine concentrations (one tailed t-test, t = 1.711, p = .045) were more likely to develop diseases of inflammation. These results suggest that early maternal care programs a pro-inflammatory phenotype, putting infants at risk for disease later in life.