Abstract # 254:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 20, 2015 01:45 PM-02:00 PM: (Cascade H) Oral Presentation


INTERACTION BETWEEN SOCIABILITY AND GROOMING NETWORK CENTRALITY ON ALOPECIA IN CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

J. Jin1, D. L. Hannibal1, B. A. Beisner1,2 and B. McCowan1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis
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Socio-psychological factors (e.g. personality and social environment) are critical in health and welfare. However, their effects on alopecia are rarely considered. To understand whether or not personality and social environment interact to affect alopecia, we examined effects of sociable personality, grooming network centrality and their interaction on alopecia in 48 rhesus macaques in a mixed age and sex social group housed in a ½ acre outdoor enclosure at California National Primate Research Center for 6-week period. Personality ratings were based on 12 10-min focal observations. Sociability was measured by averaging ratings on affiliative, warm, popular, tolerant and not solitary (Cronbach’s alpha=0.80). Weighed undirected grooming network was constructed by scan-sampling of grooming interactions. Centrality measures included betweenness, average neighbor degree, eigenvalue, alpha centrality and Bonacich power. Alopecia was scored as presence (>=25%) or absence (<25%) of hair loss. Binomial regression was used to predict alopecia using Sociability and its interaction with each of the centrality measurements respectively. Demographic variables were not significant predictors. The interaction between Sociability and grooming network betweenness significantly predict alopecia presence (B=2.10, p<0.05). Sociability was protective against alopecia only for individuals with low betweenness. For individuals with high betweenness, sociability was associated with a greater likelihood of developing alopecia. No effects of other centrality measures were found. This suggests that personality and social environment interactions play an important role in alopecia.