Abstract # 212:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


URINARY INDICES OF HEALTH IN FEMALE BLACK HOWLING MONKEYS (ALOUATTA PIGRA) IN BALANCÁN, MEXICO: COMPARING GROUPS WITH HIGH AND LOW IMMATURE-TO-FEMALE RATIOS

E. L. Zucker1, J. C. Serio-Silva2,3 and D. Tejero-Geronimo3
1Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciiences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA, 2Instituto de Ecologia AC, 3Estación de Investigación Primatólogica y Vida Silvestre
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     Higher ratios of immature individuals to adult females in groups of nonhuman primates indicate greater reproductive output per female and potentially greater reproductive success for those females compared to females in groups with lower ratios. To assess possible differences in general health of females in low and high ratio groups, urine samples from female black howling monkeys at Ranchería Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez, Balancán, Mexico were collected during a 2-month period. The high and low ratio groups contained females from groups in both habitat types (playón and rainforest fragments). Urine samples were tested in the field for 10 parameters with commercially-available reagent strips. Females in the groups with lower ratios (< 1.0; 4 groups; mean = 3 females/groups; 21 samples) had higher proportions of samples with ketones, proteins, nitrites, and leucocytes than did females in the groups with higher ratios (> 1.0; 11 groups; mean = 2.3 females/group; 99 samples), suggestive of poorer health, although differences were relatively small. Females in groups with lower ratios had urine samples that were more alkaline, on average, and of higher specific gravity, although mean values in both groups were within the normal range for both parameters. While longitudinal study of individuals is necessary to document fully differences in reproductive success, the patterns of results reported here suggest differences in general health of females might contribute to differential reproduction.