Abstract # 213:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF ALOPECIA IN A LARGE POPULATION OF INDOOR-HOUSED RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

P. D. Tenpas, M. Ivanovic , D. Brown and P. Pierre
University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1220 Capitol Court, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, WI 53715, USA
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     Nonhuman primate alopecia may be a potential marker of compromised welfare. However evidence suggests developmental, reproductive, and seasonal factors may influence expression. Our goal was to examine how these factors may help explain alopecia within our colony. Using ImageJ, we measured alopecia as percent of total surface area in a mixed age and sex group of rhesus macaques (n = 197). Images were collected during routine clinical evaluations at 3 time points over 1 year (winter13: summer13: winter14). Analysis showed a significant main effect across time [F(2,195] = 3.80, p < .05), with winter13 lower than summer13 (p < .01 ) and winter14 (p < .05). A marginal effect of sex was observed (p = .07). Six age groups were calculated to assess developmental effects: 0-3yrs (n = 63), 3-6yrs (n = 41), 6-9yrs (n = 42), 9-12yrs (n = 22), 12-15yrs (n = 13), 15yrs< (n = 16). Analysis revealed a significant main effect for age [F(5,185] = 5.87, p < .0001), with animals 0-3yrs having less alopecia than all groups except 15yr< group (p < .05). 3-6yr animals had significantly greater alopecia than 6-9yrs and 15yrs<, and significantly less area than 12-15yrs (p < .05). We found that both pubertal transition and middle age animals are at the highest risk for alopecia expression. This suggests these periods are primary targets for future study.