Abstract # 6282:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


CAPTIVE FEMALE BONOBOS (PAN PANISCUS) TEND TO BE MORE SOCIAL DURING TOOL USE THAN MALES

D. M. Goodkin-Gold1, C. M. Brand1, K. J. Boose1, F. J. White1 and A. Meinelt2
1University of Oregon, Department of Anthropology , Eugene, Oregon, USA, 2Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Columbus, Ohio, USA
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      Tool use occurs in several non-human species, including primates. Within the genus Pan, chimpanzees (P. troglodytes) exhibit tool use in both the wild and in captivity. Tool use in bonobos (P. paniscus) has been documented in captivity and suggested to occur in the wild. Recent comparative studies on chimpanzees and gorillas propose that social tolerance may facilitate the acquisition of tool use behavior in great apes. We previously reported that captive bonobos use tools in smaller social groups than gorillas and chimpanzees suggesting that number of neighbors do not play an integral role in tool use acquisition in bonobos. Here we investigate sex and age differences in these small social groups. Subjects were 16 bonobos housed at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium where an artificial termite mound was placed in their outdoor exhibit and baited on a daily basis. All-occurrences of tool use at the mound and individuals present were video-taped and coded later where party size and composition were determined for each fishing bout. Females fished in larger groups (avg.=1.8 individuals) than males (avg.=1.3 individuals) (n=9, F=4.38, p<0.05). While there was no difference between adult and subadult males, adult females fished in significantly larger groups than subadult females (n=5, F=26.03, p < 0.0001). These results support previous knowledge of bonobo sociality where females are more socially cohesive and males tend to be more solitary.