Abstract # 6302 Event # 29:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 01:50 PM-02:10 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Oral Presentation


INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN AFFECTIVE PROCESSING RELATE TO SOCIAL NETWORK STATUS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

E. Bliss-Moreau1,2, B. Beisner1,2, G. Moadab1,2 and B. McCowan1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2University of California, Davis
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     Accumulating evidence suggests the properties of human social networks influence individual’s affective processing. We tested the hypothesis rhesus monkeys’ (Macaca mulatta) roles in their networks (e.g., rank, dominance rank certainty [DRC]) were related to individual differences in affective processing. We measured 3-minutes of autonomic nervous system activity (ANS) data while monkeys were lightly sedated. ANS activity is thought to be critical for affective experience in humans (Barrett & Bliss-Moreau, 2009; Craig, 2009) and varies with affective states in monkeys (Bliss-Moreau, Machado, & Amaral, 2013). By recording both electrocardiogram and impedance-cardiogram we indexed activity in both branches of the ANS – the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems, typically thought of as the “rest-and-digest” and the “fight-or-flight” systems, respectively. Neither rank nor DRC predicted either parasympathetic or sympathetic activity for females (N=22). In contrast, rank and DRC were significant predictors of activity in both systems for male subjects (N=8) and explained substantial variance (R2parasympathetic=.845; R2sympathetic=.887). Higher rank and DRC were associated with lower parasympathetic (?rank= -.793, prank=.008; ?DRC= -.755, pDRC=.009) and higher sympathetic (?rank= -.506, prank=.020; ?DRC= .964, pDRC=.001) activity. Thus, high status males, even when they are certain of their ranks, are always physiologically primed to defend their social roles. In contrast, rank and DRC may not influence female physiology because females largely acquire/maintain their social roles via kin alliance relationships rather than their own competitive ability.