Abstract # 198:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


THE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF EARLY REARING ENVIRONMENT ON DAYTIME AND NIGHTTIME BEHAVIORAL ACTIVITY OF ADULT MALE RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA) ACROSS THE LIFESPAN.

P. J. Pierre2,3 and A. J. Bennett4,1
1Wisconson National Primate Research Center, 1220 Capital Ct, Madison, WI 27157, USA, 2Wisconson National Primate Research Center, 3Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, 4Department of Psychology and Harlow Laboratory for Biological Psychology, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Madison, WI.
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     In humans, early life adversity is associated with deleterious health outcomes across the lifespan. Young nursery-reared (NR) animals are reported to be more reactive than their mother-reared (MR) counterparts, but show less gross motor activity. Few studies have examined the persistence of the effect of early rearing to physical health, activity, and morbidity in adult animals. We measured activity levels of adult male rhesus macaques with different early infant experiences (n=6, MR; n=6, NR) Activity levels were measured with a Actiwatch™ actimeter yearly in the home cage environments over the span of the 6 years (10 to 16 years). The 24hr activity count averages were calculated for day and night-time activity. Monkeys were more active during the light portion of the light:dark cycle. Daytime activity decreased significantly with age (F (5,50)=3.51, p=.008). No differences in behavioral activity between the two rearing groups were observed in either phase of the light cycle. These data provide evidence that monkeys with differential early rearing experiences exhibit similar activity patterns in adulthood and into the middle-age period where we would expect declining activity. Our data suggest that rearing group differences in motor activity observed in the infant and juvenile period are not maintained in adult animals and suggest previously reported activity differences may require a salient environmental challenge to be observed.