Abstract # 6313 Event # 135:

Scheduled for Friday, June 19, 2015 11:30 AM-11:45 AM: (Cascade H) Oral Presentation


COMPARISON OF STANDARDS AND OVERSIGHT OF CHIMPANZEE CARE AND WELFARE ACROSS HOUSING SETTINGS

A. Bennett
Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53715, USA
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     More than half of the chimpanzees living in the US are housed in zoological parks, sanctuaries, and other settings, while the rest live in research facilities. The current regulatory system in the US is based in categorization according to the purpose, or type of “use” of nonhuman animals. As a result of this structural characteristic, the system results in inherent inequalities for standards, oversight, and protection of the welfare of nonhuman primates. Recent federal decisions about the long-term care of US federally-owned chimpanzees highlight long-standing and unresolved questions about equity in treatment, regulatory protection, and ethical decision-making about apes, regardless of the settings in which they live. Comparison of the different standards and settings can inform evaluation of equitable treatment, identify potential routes for reconfiguration of the current system, and assist continued evolution of practices and policies that best serve the animals’ welfare. The evaluation of long-term care for federally-owned chimpanzees underscores the value and need for scientifically-informed consideration of the welfare of all captive apes, regardless of the setting in which they live. The recent decisions also highlight the need for a broader framework for consideration of policy and practice decisions that take into account the balance of potential benefit and potential risks at the level of likely welfare outcomes for individuals, species, society, and the environment.