Abstract # 6315 Poster # 96:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2015 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Cascade AJBCD) Poster Presentation


COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF COMMUNICATION IN CAPTIVE PAIRS OF AOTUS NANCYMAAE IN A SEMI-NATURALISTIC ENVIRONMENT.

A. A. Rodriguez, A. Salazar, M. F. Gonzalez and S. Evans
DuMond Conservancy for Primates and Tropical Forests, 14805 SW 216 Street, Miami, Florida 33170, USA
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     Owl monkeys are the only nocturnal anthropoid and thus rely more on olfactory and vocal communication rather than vision. Detailed observations on olfactory and vocal communication are more easily studied in captivity but work in the field has helped us understand their functional value. The DuMond Conservancy houses owl monkeys in outdoor enclosures and they are exposed to changes in temperature, rainfall, and luminosity. Coupled with excellent observation conditions the advantages of studying owl monkey communication at the DuMond conservancy are without parallel. For several years we have been conducting a comprehensive study of owl monkeys’ communication in twelve pairs of Aotus nancymaae. Under these semi-natural conditions we discovered high rates of olfactory communication (scent marking and urine drinking) at 13.5 per hour. Vocal communication (chucks, trills, hoots, and alarm calling) yielded rates of 6.7 per hour. Compared to both vocal and olfactory, visual communication (arching and lip-smacking) appeared to occur at a lower rate of 2.1 per hour. We believe the lower rates of visual communication in owl monkeys are accurate; however, we concede that the difficulties in observation in a semi-natural habitat and at night may have resulted in some underreporting of close range communication.