Abstract # 226:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 20, 2015 10:00 AM-10:15 AM: (Cascade H) Oral Presentation


VARIATION IN PREDATORY BEHAVIOR OF GREATER SLOW LORISES (NYCTICEBUS COUCANG) ASSOCIATED WITH ARTHROPOD PREY CHARACTERISTICS

G. A. Fuller1,2, .. Iryantoro3, .. Wirdateti4 and K. Nekaris1
1Oxford Brookes University, Nocturnal Primate Research Group, School of Social Sciences and Law, Oxford, USA, 2Center for Zoo Animal Welfare, 3Cikananga Wildlife Center (Pusat Penyelamatan Satwa Cikananga), Kecamatan Nyalindung Kabupaten Sukabumi, Provinsi Jawa Barat, Indonesia, 4Division Zoology, Research Center for Biology, Lembata Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia (LIPI), Gd. Widyasatwaloka, Jakarta-Bogor
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      Although slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) are known to consume arthropods and small vertebrates, observations of their predatory behavior are constrained by their arboreal, nocturnal lifestyle. We examined predatory behavior in N = 22 greater slow lorises (N. coucang) that were wild-caught and housed in a rescue center in Java, Indonesia following confiscation from illegal wildlife trade. We experimentally offered lorises arthropods collected in Java (N = 75 trials) and recorded their predatory behaviors using live and video observations. We hypothesized that slow lorises would adjust their behavior with the size, escape potential, and toxicity of prey. We compared rates of pre-capture behavior, attack latencies, and consumptive behaviors using a multivariate ANOVA. Lorises were faster to capture prey with higher escape potentials (MANOVA: Hotelling’s Trace = 0.749, F12,43 = 2.683, P = 0.009), but their pre-capture stalking behaviors varied only with prey type (MANOVA: Hotelling’s Trace = 1.331, F72,594 = 1.372, P = 0.028). Lorises selectively performed a unique investigative behavior—tongue-flicking—in response to noxious prey, suggesting chemosensory input plays an important role in assessing prey characteristics. Rates of head-cocking and visually targeting prey, and the manual grasping motion used to subdue prey, indicate that the dominant sensory modality used by hunting slow lorises was vision. Our results concur with the notion that Asian slow and slender lorises are highly specialized visual predators.