Abstract # 7872 Poster # 16:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (National Ballroom AB) Poster Presentation


ACTIVITY BUDGET AND ALOPECIA IN CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES): IMPACT OF SEX, AGE, AND GROUP SIZE

M. Vazquez and C. K. Lutz
Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, 7620 NW Loop 410, San Antonio, TX 78227-5301, USA
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     The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that age, sex, and group size has on the activity budgets and coat conditions of captive socially-housed chimpanzees. Four 15-minute samples of behavioral data were collected quarterly on 128 chimpanzees (68 females) aged 5.6-51.3 years (M=26.8) that were housed in groups ranging from 2-6 individuals (M=3). The data were collected using an instantaneous point sampling technique. Categories of behavior included aggression/arousal, social, active, rest, eat/drink, self-directed, object-directed, and abnormal. Alopecia was scored separately using a 6 point scale ranging from 0 (no alopecia) to 5 (severe alopecia). The most common behavior was rest; the least common were aggression/arousal and abnormal. The average alopecia score was 1.3 (range: 0-5). Using sex, age, and group size as independent variables, a linear regression was conducted on the behavior categories and the alopecia scores. Larger social groups were more likely to engage in social interactions (b=0.718, p<0.005) and less likely to engage in object-directed behavior (b=-0.211, p<.05). Older animals exhibited more abnormal behavior (b=0.084, p<0.005) and less object-directed behavior (b=-0.051, p<0.001), and males exhibited more self-directed behavior (b=0.754, p<0.05). There was no effect of the independent variables on alopecia. An understanding of the influence of group size, sex, and age on chimpanzee behavior and alopecia will allow us to better tailor behavioral management to individualized needs. Supported by P51OD011133.