Abstract # 49:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (National Ballroom AB) Poster Presentation


SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES IN INFANT CARE IN SAN MARTIN TITI MONKEYS (PLECTUROCEBUS OENANTHE) IN PERU

S. Hodges
Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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     Parental investment is high in primates, yet it is unclear what effects environmental factors have on this investment. This study examined the impact of food availability, group identity, and infant age on the frequency of parental care, male care, alloparental care, and overall infant care in two habituated groups of Plecturocebus oenanthe. Research was conducted for 10 months from 2015 to 2016 and a total of 9,263 infant observations were collected. Leaf availability was calculated as the monthly average of foliage percentage. Monthly fruit and flower availability were estimated from September to December in 2016 by dividing the number of fruit and flower-bearing trees by the total number of trees monitored. Data were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models in SAS 9.4. Alloparental care was significantly higher, and all other forms of care were significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 in 2015 (p<0.01). The interaction between group identity and infant age significantly impacted parental care and overall infant care (p<0.05) in 2016. Food availability was significantly associated with male care (p<0.01). It is unknown why there were significant differences in infant care between groups in 2015, though infant rejection was observed more often in Group 1. Results from 2016 suggest that food availability impacted male care, however given the small sample size caution should be used when interpreting results more broadly.