Abstract # 110:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 02:15 PM-02:30 PM: (National Ballroom Salon A) Oral Presentation


A TOKEN-TRAINED CAPUCHIN (CEBUS APELLA) NAMES WHAT HE HAS SEEN BUT LOOKS FIRST AT WHAT HE HAS NOT SEEN

P. G. Judge, S. M. Faiad and M. G. Messina
Bucknell University, Animal Behavior Program, 1 Dent Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837, USA
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Metacognition, or knowing what you know, is often assessed through an information-seeking paradigm in which an animal can act to gain more knowledge about a situation before making a decision. We tested for information seeking in two captive brown capuchin monkeys that had learned to associate particular tokens with particular foods. They were trained that when a food item was visible and they were presented with two tokens, they received the food item if they selected the token that was associated with that food. We tested for information seeking by hiding a piece of food in a cup and holding it above the monkey’s head during token selection trials. On some trials the monkey would be shown the food item before it was raised and others not. If the monkeys sought information, they could climb up the caging and look in the cup on unseen trials before making a token selection and would not need to look on witnessed trials. One monkey looked into the raised cup more than expected when he was not knowledgeable about the contents and looked less than expected when he was shown the contents of the cup before it was raised, Chi-square(1,60)=24.31, p<.001. The second monkey tested never sought information about the contents of the cup. Results provide evidence for information seeking in a brown capuchin monkey.