Abstract # 40:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (National Ballroom AB) Poster Presentation


EFFECTS OF EARLY LIFE EXPERIENCES ON AGGRESSION, AFFILIATION, OXYTOCIN AND ARGININE-VASOPRESSIN IN CAPTIVE CALLICEBUS CUPREUS$

L. R. Witczak1,2, J. P. Capitanio1,2, E. Ferrer1 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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Coordinated activation of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP), in conjunction with partner-directed behaviors, help maintain monogamous bonds. Negative early-life experiences (e.g. loss of parent, trauma) can lead to increased aggression and lower baseline AVP concentrations. We conducted a mirror study using 20 coppery titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) pairs to identify the effects of experience on AVP, OT, and responses to a perceived intruder in a monogamous New World monkey. A mirror was moved in front of the subject’s homecage for 5 minutes, showing either the back of the mirror (control), or the reflective front of the mirror (experimental). A total of 2 exposures (1 experimental, 1 control) were completed. Behaviors were scored using an established ethogram. We conducted femoral blood draws after both conditions to quantify plasma OT and AVP using enzyme immunoassay validated for titi monkeys. We used generalized linear mixed model analysis of variance to predict changes in AVP and OT levels from baseline as a function of changes in recorded behaviors, early-life stressors, and their interactions. We expect to observe positive relations between early adversity and changes in aggression. We also expect a to observe a greater increase in OT and AVP levels from baseline in males that experienced early-life adversity. Results from this study may help elucidate potential causes of and neurobiological mechanisms underlying aggression.