Abstract # 141:

Scheduled for Sunday, August 27, 2017 09:00 AM-09:15 AM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


A COMPARISON OF ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES) HOUSED IN PRIMADOMES™ OR CORRALS

S. J. Neal Webb1,2, J. Hau2 and S. J. Schapiro1,2
1Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 650 Cool Water Drive, Bastrop, TX 78602, USA, 2Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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Primadomes™ and corrals, two types of housing options available to captive chimpanzees, differ in several physical features, including closed (primadomes™) or open (corrals) tops, mesh (primadomes™) or concrete (corrals) walls, and available space per animal (142 ft2/individual in primadomes™; 516 ft2/individual in corrals). Our group has produced one preliminary study comparing differences in chimpanzee behavior across these two types of housing conditions; only social play differed significantly between chimpanzees housed in primadomes™ and corrals. Here, we observed the behavior of four chimpanzee groups: two groups housed in primadomes™ (n=14) and two groups housed in corrals (n=16). Focal animal observations were performed to examine social proximity, and affiliative, abnormal, locomotor, aggressive, sexual, species-typical, and solitary behaviors. On average, chimpanzees in primadomes™ spent significantly less time resting [9.6% primadomes™, 18% corrals, t(22.8)= -3.3, p=.003], and more time climbing [1.2% primadomes™, 0.06% corrals, t(15.6)=3.35, p=.004], foraging [1.5% primadomes™, 0.04% corrals, t(14.64)=2.1, p=.055], and using enrichment [2.2% primadomes™, 0.6% corrals, t(16.97)=2.81, p=.012] than did corral-housed chimpanzees. There was also a trend toward more time spent alert, but inactive, in primadomes™ [41% primadomes™, 34% corrals, t(28)=1.81, p=.08]. Time spent in all other behaviors, including aggressive, affiliative, and abnormal (behaviors indicative of well-being) did not differ significantly between chimpanzees in primadomes™ and corrals. Overall, these activity patterns suggest that chimpanzees in both housing conditions experience comparable well-being.