Abstract # 7932 Event # 124:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 03:15 PM-03:30 PM: (Grand Ballroom) Oral Presentation


WESTERN AND MEDITERRANEAN DIET EFFECTS ON WEIGHT GAIN, CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM AND CSF MARKERS OF BRAIN HEALTH IN FEMALE CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES (MACACA FASCICULARIS)

C. A. Shively1, T. C. Register1, T. J. Montine2, C. D. Keene2 and S. Craft3
1Wake Forest School of Medicine, Dept Pathology, Comparative Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1040, USA, 2University of Washington, Seattle, 3Dept. Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine
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     Western (WEST) diet is associated with increased, whereas Mediterranean diet (MED) is associated with decreased risk of chronic diseases, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular cognitive impairment. However, these associations are from population-based studies that may be confounded, or from rodent studies with limited translational relevance. Here we report effects of WEST versus MED diet on body mass index (BMI), the insulin response (IR) to a glucose tolerance test (GTT), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD risk: amyloid (A)-beta40 and 42, total tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (tau-p181), and the ratio tau-p181:Abeta42, a sensitive predictor of AD risk in humans. 40 socially housed middle-aged macaques consumed monkey chow for 8 months and BMI, ivGTT-IR, and CSF biomarkers were measured. The monkeys were randomized to WEST or MED for 2 years and measures were repeated. Mixed models ANOVA revealed an increase in those consuming WEST but not MED in BMI (diet X treatment phase p=0.001) and IR (diet X treatment phase p=0.03); lower Abeta40 levels in the MED group (p<.04), and a diet X time X age interaction (p<0.04) for tau-P181:Abeta42. Among older animals, WEST had increased whereas MED had decreased tau-P181:Abeta42. These results suggest that MED diet may preserve vascular integrity (decreased Abeta40), and WEST diet may increase AD risk (increased tau-P181:Abeta42). These changes may be mediated by peripheral hyperinsulinemia due to increased adiposity.