Abstract # 7935 Event # 194:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 12:45 PM-01:00 PM: (National Ballroom Salon A) Oral Presentation


EARLY LIFE MEASURES OF TEMPERAMENT PREDICT HAIR CORTISOL AND RANK ATTAINMENT FOLLOWING NEW GROUP FORMATION IN CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

J. B. Linden1, B. McCowan2,3,4, J. P. Capitanio2 and L. A. Isbell1,3
1University of California, Davis, Department of Anthropology, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95618, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California, Davis, 4Veterinary Medicine: Population Health & Reproduction, University of California, Davis
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     Group fusions, in which two formerly separate social groups merge, have been documented in several species of cercopithecines; yet while social behavior after group fusion has been described, little is known about how individuals differ in their responses to group fusions. We report on a management-directed new group formation in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) as a model of group fusion. We examine whether interindividual differences in temperament during infancy affect physiological and social responses to new group formation years later, measured through hair cortisol and rank attainment 9 mos after “group fusion”. The new group comprised 111 individuals. Subjects included all individuals present for hair sample collection and whose temperaments had previously been profiled (n = 45). Animals were sometimes removed from the group for medical or management purposes, reducing sample size at 9 months after group formation (n = 22). Individuals’ ages and ranks were obtained from colony records. Our results show that early-life measures of emotionality and activity predict later-life hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity and rank attainment in response to new group formation. Individuals characterized in infancy as more emotional (multiple linear regression, alpha=0.05) and more active (alpha=0.05) exhibited lower hair cortisol profiles after 9 mos. Individuals characterized in infancy as more active (alpha=0.05) attained higher rank after 9 mos. Our results demonstrate that temperament measures in infancy can predict individual outcomes years later.