Abstract # 219:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 02:00 PM-02:15 PM: (National Ballroom Salon A) Oral Presentation


AN EVOLUTIONARY BASIS FOR VITAMIN D METABOLISM IN THE BABOON, PAPIO SPECIES: CAPTIVE AND FERAL

T. E. Ziegler1,2, A. Kapoor1,2, N. Binkley2, K. S. Rice3,4, J. Rogers1,5, C. J. Jolly6 and J. Phillips-Conroy7
1Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53715, USA, 2University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3Southwest National Primate Research Center, 4Texas Biomedical Research , 5Baylor College of Medicine, 6New York University, 7Washington University
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     Vitamin D, an essential vitamin and hormone, is absorbed either through UV radiation or secondarily through dietary sources. Little is known of how it varies in wild primates. We compared vitamin D metabolites in three species of baboons with differences in skin coloration and the density of their pelage. We compared Papio anubis, P. cynocephalus and P. hamadryas with captive P. anubis from the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC). Blood samples were analyzed by LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry) using a vitamin D panel. Like other studies of vitamin D3 supplemented captive baboons and macaques, the SNPRC baboons had higher levels of Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) than wild African baboons (t=8.35, df=105, p<0.0001). Vitamin D3 levels differed between the wild African species (F=12, 2, 89, P<0.0001). P. anubis , which has the darkest skin and densest fur, had the lowest Vitamin D3 levels, while hamadryas, with pink face and buttocks and sparse, white fur, had the highest (Tukey’s P<0.05). Similar results were found for circulating vitamin D3, 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 and intracellular-acting 24,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3. Additionally, there was a within species age effect on their Vitamin D levels. These data suggest that vitamin D3 in baboons is related to differences in the melanin content of skin and the density of fur, providing an adaptive means for regulating vitamin D levels. Funding: NIH P51OD011106, NSF BCS-1029363.