Abstract # 7937 Poster # 10:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (National Ballroom AB) Poster Presentation


TOSSING AND TURNING THROUGHOUT THE NIGHT: A LOOK AT CHIMPANZEE SLEEP PATTERNS USING OVERNIGHT CAMERAS

L. Keller, K. A. Cronin, L. M. Hopper, M. A. Leahy and S. R. Ross
Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, Lincoln Park Zoo, 2001 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60614, USA
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     Most primate behavior studies tend to start when the animals wake in the morning and end when they go to sleep for the evening. As such, there is relatively little known about what goes on at night for diurnal primates, such as great apes. Given that quality of sleep is thought to influence cognition and possibly welfare in both humans and nonhuman primates, assessments of sleep behavior for captive apes may be of particular importance. We studied the nighttime activity, a proxy for sleep quality, of a group of six adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) housed at Lincoln Park Zoo. Observations were taken from video recordings that spanned from evening nesting time (approximately 5pm) to morning waking time (approximately 6am). To date, 340 hours of focal data have been scored with five-minute intervals recording body movement and posture changes. Movement rate was consistent throughout the night and across individuals; 64.3±2.3% of visible scans revealed movement relative to the previous scan with little variation throughout the night (hourly range 55.8-69.5%). Despite frequent movement, chimpanzees were typically laying down (99.2% of visible scans). These results suggest that these chimpanzees maintain a consistent yet moderate level of activity throughout the night. Further investigations will elucidate the factors that affect sleep patterns for apes and provide useful information to aid managers caring for captive populations and promoting positive animal welfare.